7 Best Batoning Knife Reviews for Survival (Chopping & Splitting Wood) In 2020

Batoning, which is chopping wood and splitting wood, is a necessity when looking at how to survive out there. The tools that come along are the tools used to survive, and when talking about survival, only the best survival knives should even be considered. The best survival knife is going to be able to turn pieces of wood into easily combustible splinters, and split wood with comfort and no worries of dealing with a chipped or broken knife blade. 

When it comes down to it, a full tang, fixed blade knife is the only knife fit for batoning wood. Companies like Ka-Bar and Gerber have been the names of the industry for so long, but without a doubt, Morakniv has given us the best batoning knife of 2020. 

To help you help yourself when stuck in a tricky spot out there, we have done the research and laid out the best possible options for batoning knives. Look no further, here are the best batoning knives that will ensure your survival. 

IMAGEPRODUCTDETAILS
Morakniv Garberg Full Tang Fixed Blade Knife
  • Features: Tough and impact resistant polyamide handle. Full tang 4.3 inch Sandvik Steel blade.
  • Benefits: Superb Grip, Blade easily brought to top razor-sharp quality.
Check Latest Price
Ka-Bar BK-22 Becker Companion Fixed Blade Knife
  • Features: Hefty construction build with thick blade, Customizable handle, 1095 Cro-van steel.
  • Benefits: Immense durability for wood batoning, easily split wood.
Check Latest Price
Cold Steel SRK Survival Knife
  • Features: Tested in all environments and sported by Navy SEALS, SRK Steel
  • Benefits: Lower price point without sacrificing quality
Check Latest Price

Overall, the Morakniv Garberg offers the top tier of each quality that you want when choosing the best batoning knife, and even the best camping knife. Its blade comes in just over 4 inches, making it a versatile knife that will still stand up to the rigors of batoning. The rubber grip is unbeatable. It is made to be easy on your hands while giving you the best no-slip control. The Sandvik stainless steel can be brought to one of the sharpest edges out there, and will hold that edge through brutal hours of batoning. The Morakniv Garberg makes it so you only need to bring one knife out there with you, and never have any worries about needing another. 


7 Best Knifes for Batoning Reviews

1. Morakniv Garberg Full Tang Fixed Blade Knife – TOP PICK

Morakniv knows what they’re doing. Simply put, they produce high-quality knives that can be brought to be one of the sharpest blades available. When they started making full tang blades, it was questionable at first, but as always they have exceeded expectations. 

The Morakniv Garberg’s blade is 4.3 inches long and made of Sandvik stainless steel with high hardness and corrosion resistance. The polyamide handle provides an ergonomic grip that both fits the hand well, but makes sure it isn’t slipping when batoning. 

As versatile as they come, this knife will switch from splitting heavy wood into seamless feathering all while maintaining the sharp edge. The Morakniv Garberg is made to last, no fluff gets in the way when strapped to your best bug out pack. 

Features: 4.3-inch Sandvik stainless steel, streamlined handle, ergonomic grip, full-tang

Pros

  • Sandvik steel holds a sharp edge
  • Best knife for versatility
  • Thicker blade
  • Optional leather sheath

Cons

  • Not the prettiest looking knife

2. Ka-Bar Becker BK22 Companion Knife – BEST CLASSIC COMPANION KNIFE

Every knife lover has owned Ka-Bar products or at the very least have dreams of them. Straight out of that dream is the Ka-Bar Becker. This beast of a knife will baton through forests with ease to then come back into camp and ave the edge of a straight-razor. 

The Becker was made for batoning. It isn’t what you want to pick when starting to prepare dinner, but for true survival this is it. The one-pound knife holds a 5.25-inch blade made of 1095 Cro-van steel. 

The blade thickness makes it so you will never have to worry about breaking this, and it’s heavy enough to perform well for chopping in addition to batoning. The hex screws on the handle made the scales easily replaceable, as the factory-made scales are not to everyone’s liking. 

Features: 1095 Cro-van steel, heavy-duty polyester sheath, 25 mm thick blade

Pros

  • The durability of the thick blade
  • Customizable
  • Holds an edge to easily break through a piece of wood

Cons

  • Heavyweight
  • Scales could give a better grip

3. Cold Steel SRK Survival Knife – BEST ON A BUDGET

This 6-inch blade supported by a textured handle shouts survival. Cold Steel produces some of the top knives on the market and this is no exception. The SRK falls into their cheaper line of knives, but for a low price-point, it still holds up. 

Some may turn their heads when seeing SRK steel knives when they are looking for 1095 carbon steel, CPM3V, or S35VN, but the SRK holds up well especially for the price it gives. This does however make the Cold Steel SRK slightly less durable and more prone to chipping.

The grip of the handle is easy to manage and provides a secure grip that is great for batoning. When looking for a lightweight survival knife that will still stand up to some rigorous testing, this is the one to grab. 

Features: 6-inch SRK blade, textured grip, low price

Pros

  • Extremely low price
  • Textured grip for better control
  • Lighter Weight

Cons

  • Less durable
  • SRK Steel is not loved by most steel fans

4. Gerber LMF II Knife

The Gerber LMF II was originally designed for warcraft uses and was field-tested by American troops. It’s a knife that doesn’t mess around and uses 420HC steel that holds an edge while staying strong. An over-sized rear-butt cap makes this a versatile knife that is both great for batoning wood and saving your life in a downed aircraft. 

The sheath that comes along with the LMF is wildly strong and has a built-in knife sharpener. It will help to keep your blade as sharp as possible without needing to remember to pack your preferred method of sharpening. 

Although this blade is both partially serrated and not full-tang, its durability is tried and true. This 1.3-pound mammoth will last a lifetime, and Gerber stands by that with a warranty. 

Features: Sheath with blade sharpener, partially serrated blade, lifetime warranty

Pros

  • Sturdy sheath for a secure fastening
  • Heavy-duty blade
  • Steel butt end for multi-purpose
  • Partially serrated blade

Cons

  • Heavyweight
  • Not full-tang

5. Fallkniven F1 Survival Knife

The Fallkniven F1 Survival Knife has topped some lists of the best batoning knives. It sports a 3.75-inch blade and a Thermorun elastomer handle with a visible tang at the end. The full tang design paired with a thicker blade makes this a durable knife great for hacking away and batoning wood. 

Be prepared to look for a different sheath, and possibly a different handle as they both could have used some improvements. The grip is narrow and works well for those with smaller hands, but is not ideal for larger hands or for use while wearing gloves. 

Features: Thermorun elastomer handle, visible full tang, 3.75-inch stainless steel blade

Pros

  • Thick blade for durable wood splitting
  • Razor-sharp out of box

Cons

  • Narrow handle makes it hard to use the knife
  • Kydex sheath is brittle

6. Morakniv Bushcraft Blackblade

That’s right, Morakniv makes the list twice. The Morakniv Bushcraft Blackblade is a fixed-blade knife that doesn’t sport a full-tang but does can take just as much of a beating. The 3.2 mm thick, 4.3-inch high carbon steel blade is perfect for getting the dry wood that comes from heavy batoning. 

The Bushcraft Blackblade wears a highly ergonomic rubber handle that allows for maximum grip. The grip and blade durability make this one of the best knives for batoning on the market. 

In addition to batoning, the spine of the blade is ground down to a flat edge. Paired with a fire starter, this knife will split and light the wood to keep you warm at night. As long as you care for the high carbon steel, this knife will perform right alongside those with a full-tang. 

Features: Rubber handle, 3.2 mm thick carbon-steel blade

Pros

  • Thick blade gives great durability
  • Tough rubber grip for superb control

Cons

  • Carbon-steel maintenance is necessary or the blade will rust
  • Not a full-tang

7. Schrade SCHF36 Frontier

Schrade gives survival experts another top-quality and affordable knife with the SCHF36 Frontier. This 5-inch blade is made out of 1095 steel for durability. The handle uses a ring-textured grip to ensure a solid grip while batoning. 

The black nylon sheath that comes with the SCHF36 Frontier is easily strapped to your leg or your gear and provides a secure fastening system. When you need it, it is there to depend on. 

For corrosion control, Schrade uses a powder-coating that will wear over time. Some users speak highly of the knife until experiencing chipping in the blade. For such a low price, it is hard to expect this knife to stand up to the toughest of tests. At this price point though, it holds its own. 

Features: Powder-coated blade, ring-textured grip, 1095 steel

Pros

  • Thick blade makes it durable when using a baton
  • Textured grip for better control

Cons

  • Prone to chipping

Batoning knife Buying Guide

Before jumping the gun and buying the top knife on the list, it’s important to know which one is right for you. A good batoning knife is going to take a real beating and moreso, be able to save your life. Here is what to look for in finding the best batoning knife for you.

Picking the Right Size

Swinging a log onto a knife you are holding can be tricky, especially if the blade length is too short. When you baton wood, the bigger the blade, the better. A lot of survival knives are smaller than what makes the perfect batoning knife because they are for finer tasks like feathering wood, carving traps, or skinning and gutting game. 

Look for knives that have a blade around 5 inches or larger. This comes down to your preference, but a 5 inch blade is going to provide plenty of space when you are batoning. 

Not all of the knives on this list hit 5 inches. That doesn’t, however, make them a poor choice. A shorter knife blade can provide versatility while still being great for wood batoning. 

Full Tang or Partial?

A full tang extends all the way from the hilt of the blade to the butt of the knife handle. A partial tang will end somewhere in the middle. A full tang adds a lot of durability to a knife, as there is simply more metal supporting the blow when wood batoning. 

Durability and a long life span are huge for a batoning knife. A full tang is the most likely to give that durability and make it a knife you hold on to and put through the ringer for years on end. 

Again, not every knife that is good for batoning is going to be a full tang knife. For example, the Morakniv Bushcraft Blackblade is only a partial tang, but has been tested to extremes and still holds its own even against full tang survival knives. Full tang knives are definitely the first to pick up, but a partial tang should not be the end-all.

Fixed Blade versus a Folding Knife

Often, a good survival knife is a folding knife. They pack up easily, don’t take up as much space in your gear, and can be kept out of sight a lot easier. A pocket knife made for survival situations is still incredibly durable but doesn’t have even a partial tang that will provide support when taking blow after blow of batoning. 

Fixed blade knives are going to provide much better control than a folding blade knife. There is no connection point that may allow the blade to move around separately from the handle. When out there and fighting for your life, the last thing you want is a knife that isn’t going to stay true to what task you’ve put it up to. 

There is no doubt that a fixed blade knife is the only survival knife for batoning. Some survival experts can be partial to folding knives fora lot of valid reasons, but if you are wanting something that will baton well, it may be a better idea to carry both types. 

Getting the Right Grip

The handle of the best batoning knife is going to give a solid amount of grip to help guide the knife the way you need it to go for the most efficient batoning technique. A lot of knife handles are made out of a plastic compound with additional textures stamped into them for grip. Morakniv boasts a rubber handle that provides the most ergonomic and top quality grip. 

If you are interested in customizing your knives, it may be worth looking towards knives that can easily be taken apart. The Ka-Bar Becker gives users that option with easily removable scales. 

The right grip for you is going to depend a lot on your hands. Larger hands are going to struggle with finding the right fit with smaller knives, but smaller hands may have difficulties managing the larger knives of this list. It’s best to hit up a local outdoors store and actually get your hands on the knives and see what fits your mitts the best. 


Final Thoughts

In the end, the best batoning knife is going to be able to save your life. When everything is wet, you are cold, and a fire is all that will save you, a good batoning knife is what you need. That’s why it’s of the utmost importance to make this decision an informed one. Remember, what you’re looking for is a survival knife that will be able to handle the brute force of splitting wood, which means looking for a full tang, or a partial tang that can still handle the demands. Pay attention to the grip, as control is key when batoning.

The Morakniv Garberg has come out on top throughout all of our research into batoning knives. It is part of Morakniv’s dive into full tang knives, and they have made it perfectly. It is guaranteed to provide the control needed with a rubber grip, and a Sandvik steel blade that will stay true to its point for as long as you will.

IMAGEPRODUCTDETAILS
Morakniv Garberg Full Tang Fixed Blade Knife
  • Features: Tough and impact resistant polyamide handle. Full tang 4.3 inch Sandvik Steel blade.
  • Benefits: Superb Grip, Blade easily brought to top razor-sharp quality.
Check Latest Price
Ka-Bar BK-22 Becker Companion Fixed Blade Knife
  • Features: Hefty construction build with thick blade, Customizable handle, 1095 Cro-van steel.
  • Benefits: Immense durability for wood batoning, easily split wood.
Check Latest Price
Cold Steel SRK Survival Knife
  • Features: Tested in all environments and sported by Navy SEALS, SRK Steel
  • Benefits: Lower price point without sacrificing quality
Check Latest Price
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Austin Mills

Austin Mills in an outdoor enthusiast. He's been featured on some of the top outdoor & fitness blogs sharing his expertise in order to help others. In his free time, he likes spending time with his dogs enjoying the outdoors.

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